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Representatives’ pensions and adjustment allowances

Based on his or her career, a Representative or Minister is entitled to one pension, which is paid as an old-age pension from the age of 65, or as a disability pension, which is paid to a person who loses the capacity to work before this age. A Representative’s widow and children aged under 18 are entitled to a family pension if the recipients meet the qualification criteria.

A Representative’s pension is calculated on the basis of the length of his or her career and earnings during maximally the last 15 years of the career. The maximum pension is 60 per cent of the average monthly earnings over the last 15 years of the career.

Employment pensions that a Representative has earned in addition to his or her political career are taken into account in parliamentary pensions and may reduce the amount of the Representative’s pension. 

Like other employment pensions, Representatives’ pensions are increased annually on the basis of the so-called pension index.

Adjustment pension

A person who has been a Representative before 2011 can receive an adjustment pension if he or she is not employed in the labour market. A condition is that the person has served as a representative for at least seven years. An adjustment pension is paid only to the extent that the pension together with earned income does not exceed the maximum amount of a representative’s pension.

Adjustment allowance

Representatives whose parliamentary career began after 1.3.2011 do not receive an adjustment pension, but instead an adjustment allowance. Depending on the length of time served as a representative, this allowance is paid for a maximum of three years after the period of service as a Representative has ended. The recipient’s earned and capital income affect payment of the adjustment allowance.

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